Anymore vs. Any More

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Any more and anymore are both correct words, but they’re not interchangeable and have different meanings. Anymore is an adverb referring to time that means “any longer.” Meanwhile, any more is a determiner referring to quantities. The word itself “determiner” is “determining” the amount of something. (A determiner is a word used before a noun … Read more

Already vs. All Ready

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Already and all ready are correct words that sound identical but have different meanings and usage and are not interchangeable. Already is an adverb that’s used to describe a past event that happened before now or too soon while all ready is a phrase that means “completely prepared” or “collectively prepared.” The one word already … Read more

Supper vs. Dinner

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Supper and dinner refer to the primary or largest meal eaten at midday or in the evening. In British English, supper refers to an informal light meal before bed. For example, a piece of cake and a drink. Furthermore, dinner also means a meal on a formal feast or celebration. Both terms are interchangeable and … Read more

OK vs. Okay

WordstyleHQ

Okay and OK (even O.K.) have the same meaning and usage that show approval, agreement, or “all right.” Furthermore, they are both correct and interchangeable spellings of the word. Also, there is no difference at all. They have many uses, such as interjection, adjective, adverb, verb, and noun. As an adjective and adverb, it means … Read more

Toward vs. Towards

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Toward and towards are prepositions that both mean “in the direction of” and are interchangeable. The only difference between them is the spelling. Moreover, we also use them to show direction, result, relation, help, and time. Toward is the preferred American English spelling and more favored in the United States (North America) and Canada. Meanwhile, … Read more

Everyday vs. Every day

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Everyday and every day are two correct but different words that are not interchangeable. Everyday (one word) is an adjective used to describe things that (1) occur every day (habitual), or (2) are ordinary or common. Meanwhile, every day (two words) is a phrase that functions as an adverb that means “each day.” While they … Read more

Breathe vs. Breath

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Breathe and breath are two different words with close but different meanings and are not interchangeable. Moreover, they differ both in spelling and pronunciation. Breathe is a verb that means the act of inhaling or exhaling breath, while breath is a noun that refers to the air we breathe. Do not confuse breathe with breath; … Read more

Apart vs. A Part

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Apart and a part are two correct words with different meanings and are not interchangeable. Apart (one word) is used as an adverb or adjective that implies separation, while a part (two words) means that a thing is a part of another thing. A useful technique to avoid confusion is remembering the prepositions they are … Read more

Autumn vs. Fall

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Autumn and fall are used interchangeably as nouns or words for the season between summer and winter. While both are used in American and British English, fall is more often used in American English. Moreover, autumn is considered more formal for the season. It’s still unknown why fall thrived in America—although, during the mid-1800s, American … Read more

May vs. Might

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May and might allow you to do things in English, such as making predictions and asking permission. While may and might are used interchangeably when expressing possibility or permission in everyday conservations, remember there are still differences. For example, it’s better to use might when talking about something that’s unlikely to happen to avoid confusion … Read more