Fourty vs. Forty

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Forty is the proper spelling of the number 40 in all English varieties despite four having the letter u. Thus, it’s false when people think fourty is a British spelling. In short, forty is correct, and fourty is incorrect. Moreover, fourty doesn’t exist in any dictionaries, and it’s always unacceptable in any writing.) Forty is … Read more

Alright vs. All Right

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Alright and all right both mean “okay.” However, alright is the incorrect spelling and nonstandard form of all right, while all right is correct and standard. Most instructors, editors, and critics regard alright as informal, wrong, and unacceptable. Hence, it’s best to use all right (one word) at all times. Although all right is correct, … Read more

Toward vs. Towards

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Toward and towards are prepositions that both mean “in the direction of” and are interchangeable. The only difference between them is the spelling. Moreover, we also use them to show direction, result, relation, help, and time. Toward is the preferred American English spelling and more favored in the United States (North America) and Canada. Meanwhile, … Read more

Everyday vs. Every day

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Everyday and every day are two correct but different words that are not interchangeable. Everyday (one word) is an adjective used to describe things that (1) occur every day (habitual), or (2) are ordinary or common. Meanwhile, every day (two words) is a phrase that functions as an adverb that means “each day.” While they … Read more

Breathe vs. Breath

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Breathe and breath are two different words with close but different meanings and are not interchangeable. Moreover, they differ both in spelling and pronunciation. Breathe is a verb that means the act of inhaling or exhaling breath, while breath is a noun that refers to the air we breathe. Do not confuse breathe with breath; … Read more

Apart vs. A Part

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Apart and a part are two correct words with different meanings and are not interchangeable. Apart (one word) is used as an adverb or adjective that implies separation, while a part (two words) means that a thing is a part of another thing. A useful technique to avoid confusion is remembering the prepositions they are … Read more

Onto vs. On to

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Onto and on to are prepositions that sound alike, but they are different in form (the former is one word and the latter is two words). Moreover, you can’t use them in the same situations. You use “onto” when referring to movement, understanding or awareness of a situation, and transition. Meanwhile, you use “on to” … Read more

Nevertheless vs. Nonetheless

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Nevertheless and nonetheless are adverbs that show opposition or contrast. Moreover, you can use them interchangeably to carry the meaning “in spite of that” and “notwithstanding”. While some strict grammarians argue that nevertheless and nonetheless have differences in usage, both Longman Dictionary, Merriam Webster, and Oxford English Dictionary say that nevertheless and nonetheless are interchangeable. … Read more