Premier vs. Premiere

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There’s a difference between premier and premiere, aside from one letter “e.” Premier is used mainly as an adjective to mean first in importance, order, or position. In contrast, premiere is used mainly as a noun but increasingly as a verb to refer to the first showing or performance of a play, movie, ballet, etc. … Read more

Lite vs. Light

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The difference between lite and light is lite can be a noun or an adjective, while light can be a noun, a verb, and an adjective. While light typically means energy that enables vision or “not heavy,” lite is commonly used as part of a brand name to describe a low-calorie or low-fat version of … Read more

Lense vs. Lens

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Between lens and lens, lens is the correct spelling of the word, while lense is a misspelling. Lens is a noun that refers to a part of a camera, a piece of curved glass or plastic, or the clear part inside your eye. Meanwhile, lense (the one with the letter “e”) is not a word … Read more

Regimen vs. Regiment

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While regimen and regiment may sound almost the same, these two are different words and not interchangeable. We use regimen as a noun to mean a systemic plan or a course of action, while regiment (the one with the letter “t”) is a noun referring to a body of soldiers or a large number of … Read more

Awaiting vs. Waiting

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What’s the difference between awaiting and waiting? Awaiting is the present participle of the verb “await” and is a transitive verb that needs an object, while waiting is the present participle form of the verb “wait” and is an intransitive verb that can be used with or without an object. While both words have similar … Read more

Conscience vs. Conscious

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The difference between conscience and conscious is conscience is a noun referring to the awareness of whether one’s actions are right or wrong, as in one’s “guilty conscience.” In contrast, conscious is an adjective meaning “awake” or “alert.” Although both words almost sound the same and have to do with the mind, they are correct … Read more

Nauseous vs. Nauseated

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Nauseous and nauseated are both related to nausea, but there’s a difference. Nauseous means making you feel that you are going to vomit. Meanwhile, nauseated means feeling that you are going to vomit. In short, nauseous can be best described as “causing to feel sick,” while nauseated means “feeling sick in the stomach.” For example, … Read more

Aisle vs. Isle

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Aisle and isle have the same pronunciation and almost the same spelling, but the two words are different and not interchangeable. Aisle (the one with the letter “a”) refers to a long passageway between seats in a plane, church, theater, etc., or between rows of shelves in a shop. Meanwhile, isle is another word for … Read more

Loss vs. Lost

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Loss and lost are related words, but there’s a difference. Both loss and lost have to do with losing, but they are different parts of speech. Loss is a noun referring to the act of losing. Meanwhile, lost is the past tense and past participle of “lose.” While they are different parts of speech, both … Read more

Whose vs. Who’s

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Whose and who’s are related words but are entirely different from each other. The confusion between the two is understandable; they sound the same and are spelled almost the same. Whose is the possessive form of who and shows the relationship between a person or thing and something that belongs to them. Moreover, it can … Read more